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Todd Carter has been elected as president-elect of the National Association of Biology Teachers for a three-year term beginning Jan. 1. In 2008, he will assume the position of NABT president and in 2009, he will serve as past president.
Carter is the division chair of the Natural Science, Mathematics and Physical Education Division and a grant coordinator for Seward County Community College. For 11 years in Oklahoma, he taught seventh and eighth grade life science and and ninth through 12th grade biology, advanced biology, and field courses. The past 13 years he has developed and taught undergraduate biology courses in a variety of formats including field courses, online, and blended learning environments. He earned a B.S. in biology from Oklahoma Panhandle State University and an M.N.S. in zoology from the University of Oklahoma.
Carter’s NABT activities include chair of the Two-Year College Section, member of the Long Range Planning Committee, reviewer for the “American Biology Teacher, and co-chair for the Affiliates Group revitalization project.
The current emphasis of his work at the college level has been the use of technology to create significant learning experiences, developing and supporting faculty leaders, and undergraduate minority transition programs in math and science. He has contributed articles to the “Kansas Biology Teacher,” “Academic Leadership: The Journal for Technical and Community College Leaders,” “Academic Advising Today,” NABT’s “News and Views,” and newsletters for the Kansas Association of Biology Teachers and Kansas Association for Teachers of Science.
Carter has held leadership positions with the Kansas Association of Biology Teachers, including president, and is a college representative on the Board of Directors for the Kansas Association of Teachers of Science. He presents annually at local, state, and national conferences including NABT and has been an invited presenter for Prentice-Hall’s “Teaching Innovations for Biology,” the “International Alliance of Teacher Scholars,” and the National Academic Advising Association.”
He received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development (1997), NABT’s Two-Year College Biology Teaching Award (2002), and the Balcomb Community College Teaching Award from the Southwestern and Rocky Mountain Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2004).
The National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT), headquartered in Reston,Virginia, is the oldest organization dedicated exclusively to the concerns of biology/life science educators worldwide. Formed in 1938, the original 18 members have grown to over 20 affiliates and more than 8,000 members from all levels of academia, business, industry, and other groups and individuals concerned with life science education issues. The Leader in Life Science Education, NABT empowers educators to provide the best possible biology and life science education for all students. NABT members teach more than one million students each year.