Dr. Mirta Martin, who recently took the helm as president of Fort Hays Statue University, paid a visit to Seward County Community College/Area Technical School in September. Martin toured campus and met faculty, staff, and students, who she hopes might someday attend FHSU as transfer students, she said. During a lunch meeting with the SCCC/ATS board of trustees, Martin praised the college for following many of the best practices she observed and implemented during her years of involvement in the higher education system in Virginia, where two- and four-year institutions implemented economies of scale to lower tuition costs and ensure broad access to higher education. As Kansas institutions work to meet the goal set by the Kansas Board of Regents - that 60 percent of Kansans hold an industry-recognized technical certificate, an associate of arts degree or a bachelor's degree by 2020 - partnership between institutions is critical, Martin noted. In keeping with that goal, Martin and SCCC/ATS president Duane Dunn reviewed the articulation agreement between their two institutions and affirmed a desire to work together to strengthen collaboration and partnership.



Fifth-grade students from Cottonwood and Sunflower Intermediate Schools in Liberal made their way to the Industrial Technology campus at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School as September came to a close. The fifth-graders toured campus and learned about the different programs available in the Industrial Technology division.
SCCC/ATS automotive business management and light line transportation students led the tours.
Many fifth-grade students were in awe of the new 3-D printer that was recently added to the drafting and design department, said division secretary Nicole Nee.
"Another department that caught a lot of attention was machine tool technology," she said. "The students were impressed with the machinery and how it was able to create such wonderful tools and items, including all of the parts for the ever-popular campus motorcycle."
The Seward County Community College/Area Technical School Board of Trustees met Thursday with the college’s 2014-15 academic year off to a positive start.
“I went to the Presidential Scholars Dinner [last week] and I could not have been more impressed with the students,” said trustee Sharon Hobble. “They were so friendly and outgoing.”
Board president Ron Oliver agreed.
“That’s a good group of students,” he said.

» Read More

Music and memory will play out in harmony next weekend at the Seward County Community College Showcase Theater when the Lori Geis Choir Alumni present a benefit concert "Honoring Lori's Legacy." The event, set for 7 p.m. is free to the public with a free will donation to the SCCC/ATS Foundation for music scholarships in Geis' memory.

» Read More

Strong early numbers indicate enrollment for the 2014-15 academic year at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is likely to increase, and the dorms are nearly full already, based on reservations received. The good news came in a report to the SCCC/ATS board of trustees during the August meeting on Monday.

A budget hearing at the meeting - open to the public - passed quietly, without comments. The board approved the budget as presented with a vote of 4-0. Chairman Ron Oliver, John Engel and Sharon Hobble were present. Dustin Ormiston, who was out of town, participated via speaker phone in order to establish a quorum. Board members Marvin Chance and Rick Brenneman were absent.

» Read More

Seward County Community College/Area Technical School's board of trustees voted
Monday to approve a 3.99 mill levy increase for the upcoming year. The funds will
enable the college to stay on course in the aftermath of stagnant state aid and
declining property values.

» Read More

NACE brought its industry-standard training to Seward County Community College/Area Technical School. The class is the latest installment in a 23-year partnership with the industry leader.

» Read More


Camper Emily Ibarra of Great Bend and visiting professor, Dr. Pamela Hatesohl of Kansas State University stir small batches of yogurt they will allow to ferment.

Though the Food Science and Safety program at Seward County Community College/ATS is relatively new, the career and industry possibilities are broad. This year’s FSS Summer Academy introduced students to the chemistry and biology used to study food properties, food spoilage, food processing and foodborne diseases.
What that meant in practical terms was yogurt-making, Amish friendship bread and even a cookout — after students learned the science of meat safety by injecting E.coli bacteria into raw hamburger, preparing slides, and observing what happened over time.

» Read More

Liberal High School student Jason Oyler collects soil samples during Sustainable Agriculture Academy, hosted on the SCCC/ATS campus in June.

Time was, Southwest Kansas kids spent the summer helping on the farm. Thanks to the newly-introduced Sustainable Agriculture Summer Academy, high school students in the area had the opportunity to take a look at farming in the future. With guest lecturer Dr. DeAnn Presley of Kansas State University’s Department of Agronomy, Sustainable Ag program specialist Erin Russell covered topics directly tied to the long-term enhancement of agriculture.
Topics included examination of water and soil quality, agriculture basics and how agriculture connects to basic human food and fiber needs, economic viability and quality of life not only for farmers, but for society as a whole.
Students sampled soil and water, visited a lagoon operated by Seaboard Farms and observed how lagoon water can be used for irrigation, toured the Seward County Landfill, an award-winning facility that composts materials sourced from National Beef Packing, and traveled to the Garden City research development site operated by K-State. Participants in the four-day camp stayed in SCCC/ATS dorms and ate in the cafeteria.

» Read More


SCCC/ATS students Alisha Clark and Jose Moreno-Torres, front, served as ambassadors for high school students from Liberal and the area, who attended Allied Health camp in late May.

Just after area high schools dismissed classes for the summer, the Allied Health Division hosted a two-day camp for students entering grades 9-12. Participants explored health careers in conjunction with the college’s programs for Medical Assistant, Respiratory Therapy, Surgical Technology, Medical Laboratory Technician, Sports Medicine and Nursing. Instructors addressed educational requirements, skills and typical job duties. Students participated in interactive, hands-on activities that highlighted skills, equipment, technologies and resources of the individual programs.

» Read More