The SCCC/ATS spring musical "Return to the Forbidden Planet" entertained audiences April 23, 24, and 25 in the Showcase Theatre with a mixture of Shakespeare and classic rock 'n' roll.

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The phone rings just as your supervisor asks about a mailing you were scheduled to send out yesterday. Your email "in" box is overflowing. The client who just left said, "Have a nice day," and you feel just a little guilty that you didn't offer the same encouragement.

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Diverse magazine praises college’s work

Seward County Community College/Area Technical School has landed a spot on the list of the "Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges 2015," from The Center for Higher Education Enterprise (CHEE).

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The Seward County Community College/Area Technical School Development office moved into new offices recently, thanks to a donation by longtime supporters Gene and Jo Ann Sharp of Liberal.

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On a brilliant, frozen morning in February, Jake Jimenez and Casie Yowell set off for school at the Kansas state capitol.

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Crusader staff members combined for 32 individual and overall awards, including bronze medals for both the newspaper and CrusaderNews.com website, at the Kansas Collegiate Media conference in April in Wichita.

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Snow and ice covered the tennis courts at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School during the month of December 2014. Halfway across the world, two Saints athletes hit the tennis court to play in the sunshine at the African Union Sports Council Region 5 Youth Games.

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Surgical Technology lab replicates reality
 
When Bridgette Horner backed her vehicle up to the east entrance of the Surgical Technology Lab at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School, she’d arrived to dispose of usable expired supplies from Morton County Health System in Elkhart. 
That’s not how Surgical Technology Instructor Carmen Sumner saw it, though. 
As Horner unloaded packages of disposable surgical supplies, Sumner summed it up in one word:
“Jackpot!”
Horner serves as Surgical Technologist, Central Supplies Manager and Sterile Processing Department Director at MCHS, but she’s also an alumna of the College. A member of the first-ever surgical technology class to graduate in 1998, she knows exactly what will help surgical technology students learn. 
“I’m excited to put these items to use,” Horner said. “They’re expired, so there’s no way the hospital can use them. This is one way they won’t be wasted, and they’ll help support health services in the region.”

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Most days, Seward County Community College business instructor Lisa Kennedy keeps her focus local and personal. 
During the spring of 2015, however, the professional who teaches students to be professionals traveled far from home to New York City. She attended the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations Headquarters. She could hardly wait to soak it all in, then bring fresh ideas back to the classrooms in SCCC/ATS’s business division.
Kennedy earned a $1,000 scholarship from the Kansas Council of Instructional Administrators (KCIA). SCCC/ATS Dean of Academic Affairs Cynthia Rapp presented her with the check just as the new semester got off to a start. 
Kennedy said the Commission was to focus on the current challenges to gender inequality and the empowerment of women. Talk of the challenges women face is no textbook exercise. Kennedy sees the struggle daily in her classes, which often include students who are the first in their families to attend high school and college. 
“Our population has an extremely high multi-ethnicity rate, and I am learning about the challenges that women face within each specific culture,” Kennedy said. “That specific demographic of students faces a unique set of circumstances as they navigate through the educational process."
As she teaches aspects of business, from keyboard to marketing and entrepreneurship, Kennedy pours her passion in helping students connect good business concepts to everyday life, down to such details as dressing for success at job interviews. Along with her students in the Enactus business club on campus, Kennedy helped establish the E-Boutiqe, a combination retail shop and wardrobe closet for women re-entering the workforce. 
“As an instructor, I want to empower these students to take advantage of the opportunities they have to make a better life for themselves,” Kennedy said. “I knew the Commission would provide me with networking opportunities with other women who are empowering students from across the United States. We will be able to collaborate with professionals to share success stories, and encourage each other as we seek to empower the youth in our educational systems.”
As she set out to explore the Big Apple for the first time, Kennedy was keenly aware that she, like many of her students, would be learning on the fly, encountering a slightly foreign culture, and making her way through the unfamiliar. She said the experience would help her to understand her students, and inspire her as she returned to campus. The big goal, she said, “is teach them ways to give back to their community and ethnic groups while paving the way for those who follow in their footsteps.”
In its heyday, the Gas Compressor Institute was the biggest show in town, along with its counterparts,
the Measurement and Pipeline institutes. Three times a year, hotels in Liberal, Kansas, filled to capacity,
restaurants saw waiting lines snake out the door into the parking lot, and laughter and deal-making
enlivened every club in town.
"The Gas Compressor Institute was bigger than pheasant season," said Don Ukens, owner and operator
of End2End Technologies, and longtime wireless data provider in the field.
Mike Riedel of Panhandle Eastern Pipeline Company recalls those glory days when the institutes
capitalized on a large workforce earning solid wages for companies with ever-increasing profit margins.
The combination fueled a commitment to ongoing education in order to keep pace with technological
advances. It was a thrilling time, with new inventions and methods that promised to extend the boom
indefinitely. The MPI brought a sense of national importance and hundreds of professionals to Liberal.



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